Hotels in New Plymouth, New Zealand

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Hotels in New Plymouth

New Plymouth’s appeal is lubricated by sunny coastal walks

Sitting on the west coast of New Zealand’s North Island, the city of New Plymouth is also known as Oil City and owes much of its current affluence to that expensive black stuff. Tourism too is a major industry. The sunny climate, breath-taking coastal walks, fascinating galleries and museums and an 11-mile long promenade with dramatic views; all combine to create a city which increasing numbers of tourists can’t wait to visit. There’s further historic appeal in that, for several hundred years, the site of the city was occupied by Maori tribes. It’s well worth exploring today’s New Plymouth, as well as its historic past.

Walks weave a Wind Wand of wonderment in New Plymouth

The Coastal Walkway is a prime visitor attraction and one in which the locals place justifiable pride. Stretching for almost 11 miles along the coast, it covers virtually the entire length of the city. It is also a vital part of city life; offering as it does, the opportunities for sightseeing, walking, cycling and even skating. It provides, of course, access to stunning natural views in addition to Len Lye’s now legendary Wind Wand. Over 50 yards high, this sculpture certainly deserves its prominent pride of place on the Coastal Walk. The appeal of the Coastal Walk is multi-pronged. It’s a wonderful tourist attraction, the views are sensational, there are activities that give it a life … and as a robust barrier, it protects New Plymouth from the mountainous waves that can come rolling in. There is an impressive range of accommodation waiting for you. Apartments, guest houses, hostels, and quality, top-end hotels, are all here in New Plymouth and in the surrounding region.

Mount Taranaki’s love’s labour’s lost

The elephant in the room in New Plymouth is Mount Taranaki. Towering over the city and often snow-capped; it is a monumentally 1.5 miles in height. Shed a tear for Mount Taranaki though when it becomes shrouded in cloud. This is when; Maori legend suggests, it is crying due to being demoted to the coast from an original central North Island setting. Despite its sadness, Mount Taranaki carries on regardless and delights visitors with in excess of 120 miles of walking, hiking, skiing, mountaineering and even some sky- high quality hotel accommodation. Yes, there’s a hill to climb … but you can do it; right to the summit. Less energetic activities include meandering through the Goblin Forest, snow-balling in winter and – at Wilkies Pool, riding nature’s waterslides. This New Plymouth area is also home to year-round arts and sporting events and some pretty stunning hotels and other accommodation in which to stay.

New Plymouth blossoms with a festival of dining and events

In this Taranaki region of New Zealand, the wealth of produce from the sea and the surrounding farmlands results in lots of delicious and healthy cuisine. You’ll find this in some of New Plymouth’s hotels. Restaurants though are as diverse in their menu ranges as almost anywhere else you can think of. Mouth-watering fish and seafood, succulent meats and vegetarian and vegan cuisine choices, are all offered in abundance. Nights out can include a visit to the Event Cinema. New Plymouth’s Little Theatre is also a hive of talent and activity. There are, in addition, many events and festivals that are staged throughout the year. A typical happening and staged in October is the Taranaki Fringe Garden Festival. This is a friendly, relaxed affair which gives the opportunity to nosey around other people’s houses and in particular, their stunning gardens. All sorts of events are always blossoming in New Plymouth and in this Taranaki region which is understandably known as the Garden of New Zealand.

Waves of constructive enthusiasm in New Plymouth

The New Plymouth region is steeped in history and artefacts, as can be seen at the Puke Ariki and Hawera’s Tawhiti Museums. The region’s black-sand beaches originate from the dormant volcano and are a further hint of events of days gone by. Fast-forward to today and activities that include body boarding the sand dunes or surfing, year-round, at Back Beach. Energy permitting; climb then to Paritutu Rock for more breath-taking experiences and views of the Tasman Sea and Sugar Loaf Islands. The family-friendly, Kawaroa Park has a pool and (*don’t even think about it) children’s slides that go straight into the sea. In town, the Lightning Bolt Bridge now enjoys a two-mile plus extension which adds to the length of the Coastal walkway. Characteristically, the 90-yard-long Te Rewa Bridge is built in the form of … a wave. Modern technology continues to impress with New Plymouth’s architecture and contemporary hotels.

Price range

from ‎NZ$54to ‎NZ$272

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Points of Interest - New Plymouth